It’s Wednesday – On not being nice

It’s Wednesday! Let’s hear from someone new!

no-more-mr-nice-guy_o_204116
Image description: a 3 panel comic. In the first panel, two figures stand. One in green holds a gun and says, “Alright… no more Mr. Nice Guy…” The figure in blue looks frightened. In the second panel, the figure in green turns and shoots the gun. BANG appears above the figure. In the third panel, the figure in blue runs to an older man on his knees, who has been shot and dropped a tray of cookies. The figure in blue says, “Mr. Nice Guy!!”

I want to share an excellent article on The Establishment by Alex Lu called I’m Not Going to be Nice About Ableism. Alex talks about the experience of going through college and grad school as a person who is deaf, and how the criticism that activists must be kind and patient in order to effect change is both BS and dangerous. Feel free to apply these ideas to activists of all stripes. Here’s a preview, but click through to read the entire thing:

The phrase [change hearts and minds] has become associated with a very narrow rhetorical strategy that demands that people sit down with those most hateful and violent toward them, and patiently explain their humanity, taking great pains to neuter their language surrounding any concepts that may provoke defensiveness, like “privilege” or “racism.” Moreover, it contends that making minorities look sympathetic to the majority is the only worthy goal: Outcomes like building community, showing solidarity, or disrupting harmful institutional actions are ignored.

Advertisements

It’s Wednesday – Disability and Sexuality

It’s Wednesday! Time to hear from some new voices.

emilyyates
Emily Yates, picture from Keighley News. Image description: a white woman with pastel hair and dark glasses sits in a wheel chair. She is outside, wearing a bright dress, and smiles at the camera.

Today, I want to share Emily Yate’s TED talk called Undressing Disability.

She shares about her work with the group Enhance the UK. They provide resources and support for disabled individuals and their loved ones as they seek out a full and sexual life. Emily co-runs a discussion/advice board for any and all questions individuals have in regards to sex and relationships.

Emily talks about asking the right questions, accessibility, and care and how those concerns intersect with sex and sexuality for the disabled.

Please click through to listen to the entire talk!

How Grief Sometimes Loses Course

by: Hilary Brown

It intersects at incongruous places, now crosscutting
humor, which has always been what you supposed
a parallel. It brakes and slows and finds itself
ridiculous. There you are, crying on the toilet,
and grief is there, pushing your hair back
out of your eyes, asking you whether your lost one
would like that new holographic lip gloss
or how it feels not to be able to send her the picture
you took of a kestrel, the unexpected soft red
of his breast. Ever sarcastic, ever tender, ever
speaking in your own voice. Your new companion,
marriage indissoluble and only mundane, a partner
to watch during breakfast over a spoonful
of softening cornflakes.

 


Hilary Brown is a writer and activist living in Oakland, California. Her writing explores themes of body deemed dangerous–queer, disabled, female–and the embodiment of god in nature and humanity. She seeks to celebrate what is too rarely celebrated: the necessity of decay, the simplicity of pain and healing, the slow process of becoming.


© Author/Artist retains all rights to reprint, publish, license and/or sell their Work.

 

 

November, Oakland

by: Hilary Brown

Trauma lodges
in the gut, throat, jaw, teeth
grinding themselves, eat
experience until it’s gone.
Spit it out.

It takes up residence,
digs the foundation in ground
that slips. Landslide and landslide
and landslide. It clings
to that bluff.

Plants itself. Invasive.
Killing other life. Fungus
and spores climbing trees
with rot. Dark mold
that finds its way
in greater darkness.

Pretty birds of grief
eating the essential stuff.
No other animal
can live.

Russian thistle
blocking the roads
in that picturesque way
it has. Still there’s no
getting through it.
Just sitting surrounded,
hungry, staring at the sky,
falling in love with all this
loss.

 


Hilary Brown is a writer and activist living in Oakland, California. Her writing explores themes of body deemed dangerous–queer, disabled, female–and the embodiment of god in nature and humanity. She seeks to celebrate what is too rarely celebrated: the necessity of decay, the simplicity of pain and healing, the slow process of becoming.


© Author/Artist retains all rights to reprint, publish, license and/or sell their Work.