Unseen Darkness

Content Warning: violence against women, child abuse

artist: Thiviyaa Sehasothy

Unseen Darkness - Thiviyaa Sehasothy, 2017

Unseen Darkness

12 in. x 12 in.

acrylic on canvas

2017

 

Unseen Darkness - Manivillie Poem
Poetry by Manivillie Kanagasabapathy
Dilani Bala - Portrait Reference
Photography by Dilani Bala

 

From the artist: This collaboration was the result of a complete domino effect that all started with an organization, ‘ANBU‘ (Abuse Never Becomes Us). ANBU does important work focused on childhood sexual abuse. They are abolishing the taboo and stigma associated with abuse and the effect of abuse growing rampant within the Tamil community, as it is in many others.

I am so excited to share this painting and collaboration between artist Thiviyaa Sehasothy, poet Manivillie Kanagasabapathy, and photographer Dilani Bala with you. Click through to read more about the process and cause on Thiviyaa’s website! Links to all three collaborators’ social media can be found below or on the contributor page. Please click through and follow their work. It is both beautiful and important.

 

 


Artist & painter, Thiviyaa Sehasothy is the hand behind ‘Art By Thiviyaa’ in Toronto. Her paintings have bold & heavy brushstrokes, bright colours and are greatly influenced by her experiences, travels and the world around her. She creates painting to not just capture a mere moment, but instead the experience of fluidity, emotions and movement through time. An evolving narrative. See her portfolio on her website, and on Instagram & Facebook.

A Toronto based poet, Manivillie Kanagasabapathy draws inspiration from everyday moments. Finding her way back to poetry, Manivillie completed a poem a day challenge in 2016, where she successfully wrote 366 poems. Check out her poems on her website, Instagram, or follow her on Facebook.

Dilani Bala is a Tamil-Canadian visual artist with a passion to study the human condition through portraiture. Check out her work on TumblrFacebook, and Instagram.


© Author/Artists retain all rights to reprint, publish, license and/or sell their Work.
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It’s Monday! and Representation Matters

Today in checking our privilege, I want to talk about how representation matters.

Reading from scriptures* was off-and-on a near-daily experience in my formative years. (*for us that meant the Book of Mormon, the King James Bible, and some other LDS sacred texts) We read about the old Mormon prophets: Nephi, Mormon, Abinadi – their heroic and daring and unwavering faith. We read about the old testament prophets: Jacob and Abraham and Noah – their (blind) (come on, even as a child the old testament was messed up) obedience and… actually, I never got much out of those stories. And we read the new testament, the gospels mostly, and Jesus was the ultimate self-sacrificing hero there. And in my middle-child, people-pleasing way I tried very hard to be the best Mormon girl I could be, holding these men up as the epitome of devotion to God.

And then I read a version of the first chapter of the Book of Mormon with gender-swapped people and pronouns. I must’ve been at least 20, probably older, and suddenly a floor fell out from under me. I found myself crying, sobbing really. My whole life I had been missing something and I never even had been able to recognize it. I wanted to be able to see me in the stories I had been taught from birth. I wanted to be able to see me in our heroes. I didn’t know I needed it, not consciously, until it was given to me. Continue reading “It’s Monday! and Representation Matters”

With Sage and Cedar

by: Kimberly deLeon

withsageandcedar
Image description: a tree on fire is reflected in a small lake on a brown ground. There is a rock to the right, and an out of focus house in the foreground.

With Sage and Cedar

13 in. x 9 in.

digital photograph

2017

From the artist: With Sage and Cedar explores fire as a purifying cleansing force. It’s peaceful in its power and beautiful in its destruction, because the destruction is an important part of growth and change. The red roof hut here is my home with my husband and children. It’s the sprouting me that has grown out of the purification of the old me(s). Or, more broadly, it’s the embrace of self, of woman, of becoming a truer self.


Kimberly deLeon started Lift Magazine in the spring of 2017 as a personal project to both create and seek out socially responsible art. She is a recovering scientist, a recovering Mormon, and a recovering know it all. Her creative endeavors include baking, photography, and creative writing, but she would rather spend all that time watching British TV. She and her husband live in Fort Worth, Texas with their two children and their Yorkie, BamBam.


© Author/Artist retains all rights to reprint, publish, license and/or sell their Work.

 

 

Lilith’s Final Warning

artist: Kimberly deLeon

Lilithsfinalwarning
Image description: a dark photograph featuring a small red-roofed house on a brown ground surrounded by 4 fires and a rock. A small amount of dark blue sky can be seen.

Lilith’s Final Warning

15 in. x 10 in.

digital photograph

2017

From the artist: Lilith’s Final Warning focuses on fire as a violent, powerful, and somewhat uncontrollable force. It represents Lilith, an apocryphal precursor to Eve who would not be controlled by Adam. The red roof hut in the photo – the target of Lilith’s ire – is inspired by menstrual huts but more broadly, represents all the boxes we put femininity and womanhood into.


Kimberly deLeon started Lift Magazine in the spring of 2017 as a personal project to both create and seek out socially responsible art. She is a recovering scientist, a recovering Mormon, and a recovering know it all. Her creative endeavors include baking, photography, and creative writing, but she would rather spend all that time watching British TV. She and her husband live in Fort Worth, Texas with their two children and their Yorkie, BamBam.


© Author/Artist retains all rights to reprint, publish, license and/or sell their Work.